Case of the Week COW #12

CC: Left leg pain

HPI: 52 year old male with PMH of IDDM presents to the Emergency Dept. (ED) with left leg pain for the past 9 days which has become progressively worse. He is a taxi driver and reports that a part of the seat, which supports his legs, has been rubbing against his left hip/buttock/thigh and he thinks this is what’s causing the pain. He reports pain to the back of his left buttock, which radiates down the leg “like a shooting pain.” The patient has been to the ED multiple times already for similar complaints, requesting for stronger pain medications. He is upset because he feels the medicine just isn’t working. At this point, the patient is uncooperative and refuses to answer any more questions. Further history was obtained from his previous visit history, which stated he was discharged yesterday with a diagnosis of sciatica and a prescription for Lidoderm patch, Motrin and Percocet.

PMH/Birth History: N/A

Social History: N/A, refused to answer any further questions

PHYSICAL EXAM

VS: BP 125/59     HR 108     RR18   T: 98F   98% RA

General: In moderate acute distress, appears stated age, in moderate pain, uncomfortable and diaphoretic.

HEENT: Atraumatic, normo-cephalic. No deformities. PEERLA

Respiratory: Lungs CTA bilaterally.

Cardiac: +S1/S2, no MRG, regular rate and rhythm

Abdomen: soft NT ND

Extremities: B/L DP 2+, Cap refill < 3 seconds, positive straight leg (LLE); pain isolated to (L) buttock and posterior lateral thigh.

Neuro exam: CN III –XII intact. 5/5 strength in all 4 extremities with limited ROM in the LLE secondary to pain.

Skin: Diffuse erythema over the Left buttock extending down to the posterior lateral left thigh, with pitting edema. No fluctuance or streaking noted.

Labs:

WBC: 24.7     H/H: 13.1 / 39.4     Platelets 245     PMH: 22.1  Lymph: 0.7     Mono: 1.5

Na: 126     K: 5.5                 Cl: 89       CO2: 22           Glucose: 438

Bun: 38     Cr: 1.17         Alk P: 140       LFT: WNL         Albumin 3.2

Acetone: NEG

ESR: 65

CRP: 30

Lactic acid: 1.4

Images:

Repeat Vital Signs 139/81   89   16     99.7F   97% ON RA

MRI

 

 

Working Differential Diagnosis: Pyomyositis

ED/Hospital course:  Orthopedic Surgery was consulted. X-Ray did not show obvious bony involvement and ESR/CRP was not suggestive of osteomyelitis. MRI was performed on the LLE, which sowed a hyper-intense signal within multiple muscles of the pelvis and left thigh consistent with myositis. Collection within the Obturator Externus and Gluteus Maximus muscles likely represented an abscess consistent with pyomyositis. The patient was started on Vancomycin and Zosyn and sent to Interventional Radiology for drainage of the abscess. The cultures grew back MSSA. The left knee tap did not grow any organisms on Gram Stain. IR drainage was followed by orthopedic washout and debridement of the musculature with insertion of JP drain for continuous drainage. The patient’s antibiotics were switched to Levaquin and he was subsequently discharged home with Clindamycin and Bactrim for 2 more weeks. He tested negative for HIV.

Pearls & Takeaways:

  1. Don’t blow off patient’s complaints! Our patient presented with History and Physical exam consistent with sciatica with a positive straight leg test. He was on Percocet and kept asking for stronger medications for his previously diagnosed Sciatica.
  2. Make sure to undress the patient and examine the skin!
  3. If the patient is complaining of pain out of proportion to his/her exam, dig a little deeper for alternative differential!
  4. Since his Accucheck was High, further laboratory testing was done which revealed leukocytosis. The elevated white count prompted me to perform a further work up
  5. Always re-evaluate the patient! On re-evaluation, he appeared sicker and with cool, damp skin on his back and neck, solidifying my gestalt that maybe I am missing something
  6. Pyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from hematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation.
  7. Risk Factors: immunodeficiency (HIV).
  8. auerus is the most common cause of pyomyositis; it causes up to 75 – 90% of cases.
  9. Pyomyositis presents with fever and pain and cramping localized to a single muscle group. It develops most often in the lower extremity (sites include the thigh, calf and gluteal muscles) but any group of muscles can be involved including iliopsoas, pelvic, trunk, Paraspinal and upper extremities.
  10. MRI is the most useful imaging modality for diagnosing the disease. It can distinguish the defining sites of infection and rule out other entities.
  11. Nonspecific lab findings include Leukocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers but CPK are often normal.
  12. Empiric antibiotics should be directed against Staph/Strep for immunocompetent. Immunocompromised should be covered for Gram negative, gram positive and anaerobic organisms should be considered.
  13. Pyomyositis is graded based on stages.
    • Stage 1 (Invasive stage, 1-2 weeks, may only have pain) can be treated with Antibiotics alone.
    • Most patients present with Stage 2 (Suppurative stage, weeks 3-4)
    • Stage 3 (Late stage) due to delay in diagnosis and usually requires drainage for definitive management.

Case presented by Dr. Michael Hong

Euglycemic DKA

Hi all. I wanted to bring to your attention a great case. The case was a young woman with relative euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis. This diagnosis used to be quite rare and associated with pregnancy or very poor PO intake. However, with the use of SGLT2 inhibitors (which this young woman was taking) the incidence is increasing. The diagnosis highlights some very important factors about the treatment of DKA:

  • Don’t just look at the blood sugar. Calculate your anion gap. Look at the bicarb. Calculate the strong ion difference. Check for ketones. A VBG is fine for a rough estimate of pH. If you really want to get fancy, an ABG will give you an accurate base deficit that can help you figure out (along with your lactic acid, strong ion gap, or delta-delta) exactly what else is going on with the patient in the setting of multiple competing metabolic processes. But that’s only if you want to get fancy. I think you can provide great initial resuscitation without it.
  • Remember why we do what we do in DKA and all the complications you can get from treatment. The treatment is based on exactly the same principles that guide the treatment of “regular” DKA. However, they are not starting at the exact same metabolically disturbed place as most patients do. They can be just as sick, if not more, but the initial treatment has to take into consideration exactly where they are in their metabolic disarray. Things to think about as you are coming up with a treatment plan:
  • These patients need fluid. Fluid will be your friend (more on that later)
  • These patients need glucose. From the start. For a glucose less than 100-125, consider starting D10 instead of D5.
  • They need glucose because they need insulin too. They still may have some relative insulin resistance so giving them glucose alone won’t help them if they cannot get the glucose into any cells. However, as you are already starting from a lower glucose, be very gentle. If you still bolus insulin in DKA (which I do- in selected cases- and would be glad to have conversation about whether we should or not at another time) do NOT bolus these patients. I don’t have great evidence as to where to start a drip so I pick a low number. Like 1 low. I can always move up. If anyone has a better scientific explanation on how to pick your infusion rate, I’d love to hear it.
  • They need insulin so you better be sure you aren’t going to cause a malignant arrhythmia if you give it to them. Make sure your potassium isn’t going to plummet when you start insulin. Rough guideline is to make sure it is >3.3 . This is true for all DKA.
  • They don’t have a sodium correction because the glucose is normal. If their sodium is already on the higher side (around >140), think of starting with ½ NS as your base.

The attending on the case did an excellent job with this patient. He focused on fluid and recognized her severe metabolic disturbance, despite the fact that her blood sugar was trying to hide it.

I’ve included two articles below. One is two case reports on euglycemic DKA and the other talks specifically about cases involving SGLT2 inhibitors. They aren’t the best articles I’ve ever read but they are more official than I am so felt I should include them. As a said, this is a relatively new class of medications and a relatively new phenomenon.


Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis: a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma, EDM Case Reports, September 2017

Posted by:

Ruth Lamm, MD FACEP
Assistant Professor
Emergency Medicine
Critical Care Medicine
Saint Joseph’s Hospital Medical Center
lammr@sjhmc.org

Case of the Week COW #9

CC: “Post Surgical Pain” ; Abdominal pain

HPI: 8 year old Male with PMH of Sickle Cell Disease (HbSC), Post-opt Day 10 for laparoscopic splenectomy for recurrent sequestration crises presents to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining of abdominal pain x 2 days. The pain is described as diffuse and worse in the RUQ. Denies exacerbating or relieving factors. Pain is associated with constipation; last Bowel movement was 7 days prior. Mother states he did have one small BM shortly after surgery. He is tolerating PO without difficulty and does report flatus. She has been giving him Oxycodone 2mg every 6 hours for pain with minimal relief. Upon review of systems, patient reports feeling hot for the past 2 days but without a recorded temperature at home. Additionally, patient complained of a non-productive cough for 2 days and has been “breathing fast” for the same duration of time.

Physical Exam:

BP 112/74    HR 129     RR 24   SpO2 93% on RA   Temp 99.9F      26.3 kg

Constitutional: Well developed, well-nourished child who is awake, alert and in moderate distress due to pain and feeling hot; making tears

HEENT: NCAT, pupils PERRLA, neck supple

Respiratory: CTA B/L, no wheezing, rales or rhonchi

Chest/Axilla: Normal symmetrical motion, no tenderness

Cardiac: +S1/S2, RRR, no MRG,

Abdomen: Scars noted over splenectomy site which are clean dry and intact, healing well without discharge; Diminished Bowel Sounds in all quadrants; soft, non-distended with mild tenderness in all 4 quadrants. No rebound or guarding.

Neuro exam: AAO x 3. No deficits

Extremities: no edema, no tenderness or swelling

Pertinent Labs:

CBC: 42.1

HBG: 12.5

HCT: 36.9

Platelets: 721

Seg: 79

Lymphs: 9

Mono: 12

Reticulocyte count: reported as normal

Pertinent Imaging and other tests:

Working Diagnosis:

Generalized abdominal pains

Elevated WBC

Abscess of spleen

ED/Hospital course:

Surgery was consulted in the ED and they believed the pain was not related to the surgery. Abdominal U/S performed at their request showed “s/p splenectomy with gallbladder sludge.” Patient had moderate improvement in his pain after Toradol 15mg IV and Morphine 2mg IV were given in the ED. Patient also received Rocephin 75mg/kg and NS 500mL IV Fluid bolus for presumed infection with the leukocytosis of 42.1.

The patient was admitted to Pediatric Step down for further evaluation and management. Overnight, he remained comfortable with stable vital signs, afebrile and saturating 94-96% on 2L NC. On Hospital day #1, patient became febrile to 103F and continued to deny chest pain, SOB or difficulty breathing. The cough remained unchanged since admission. A repeat Chest X-Ray was obtained and the patient was diagnosed with Acute Chest Syndrome and received exchange transfusion the same day (Refer to Image below) Additionally, he received Ceftriaxone, Azithromycin, Nitric oxide and IVF at ¾ maintenance ate throughout hospitalization. On Hospital Day #4 he was discharged home.

Pearls:

Acute Chest Syndrome

  • It is the leading cause of death in patients with SCD in the United States
  • Most often occurs as a single episode, but patients may have multiple attacks resulting in chronic lung disease
  • Multiple Etiologies
    • Pulmonary infections
    • Iatrogenic cause including aggressive hydration for sickle cell painful crisis ——à causing Pulmonary Edema
    • Opioid use —–à Decreased inspiratory effort——à Atelectasis
  • New infiltrate identified on Chest X-Ray with at least one of the following: Fever, cough, wheezing, tachypnea, chest pain, hypoxemia.
  • Radiographic changes often lag behind clinical features so initially the Chest X-Ray may actually be normal (as in our case)
  • Treatment
    • Supportive: Early Supplemental Oxygen, analgesics and IV Hydration up to 1.5x maintenance rate
    • Antibiotic irrespective of cultures
    • Transfusion is believed to be lifesaving; recommendations based on empirical observations and not on firm evidence
    • Exchange transfusion seems to be more advantageous, especially in patients with a hemoglobin of > 9.0
      • It decreases the concentration of sickled hemoglobin with little iron gain
    • Inhaled Nitrous Oxide is beneficial
      • Due to its vasodilatory effects –à improved ventilation/perfusion in damaged lung tissue
      • Reduced RBC and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, therefore affecting disease progression
    • Hydroxyurea reduces occurrence of acute chest syndrome

Case Presented by Greg Cassidy, MD

 

References:

  1. Stapczynski, J. S., & Tintinalli, J. E. (2016). Tintinalli’s emergency medicine: A comprehensive study guide (8th ed.). New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education LLC..

 

Case of the Week COW #8

CC: Altered Mental Status

HPI: 50 -year-old Male with PMH of HIV, CVA and Meningitis presents to the Emergency Department (ED) for altered mental status. As per the patient’s girlfriend at bedside, the patient woke up confused and was not making any sense when he spoke. He even urinated on the floor but does not remember doing so. Patient had been complaining of back pain, testicular pain and leg pain for the past couple of weeks and had been evaluated for it in the ED. Patient also states he is currently taking “something for his HIV” but is unclear what his last CD4+ count was. Denies sick contacts. The rest of the review of systems was limited by confusion, but denied vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, or any other complaints.

Physical Exam:

BP 128/78   HR 129     RR 14   SpO2 96% on RA   Temp 102.4F

Constitutional: Diaphoretic, confused and intermittently following commands.

HEENT: NCAT, pupils PERRLA, neck supple

Respiratory: CTA B/L, no wheezing, rales or rhonchi

Cardiac: +S1/S2, tachycardia, no MRG, regular rhythm

Abdomen: soft, mildly distended with mild tenderness in RUQ and LUQ.  Was not able to appreciate any focal masses . No rebound or guarding

Neuro exam: Not oriented to time or situation, No focal deficits, moving all four extremities. Unable to complete a more detailed exam as patient remained confused.

Extremities: no edema, no tenderness or swelling

Skin: pink and warm with diaphoresis, no rashes, lacerations, or abrasions

Pertinent Labs:

(Per Sorian Inpatient) CD4 = 120 on June 2017

Sepsis workup summary (normal if not reported):

  • Trop 0.045ng/ml
  • Sodium 126
  • WBC 5.8       Chloride 93
  • RBC 3.72      CO2 19
  • HBG 10.3      Glucose 116
  • HCT 30.3       BUN 89
  • Platelets 108
  • Cr 2.90 (↑ from baseline)
  • Bands 27        Total Bili 4.5
  • Lymphs 3       Total Protein 5.7
  • Monos 2         Albumin 2.6
  • Lymphocytes 0.2
  • Alk Phos 346   Monocytes 0.1
  • AST 143
  • ALT 58
  • Lactic acid 3.4
  • U/A negative
  • CSF negative

Pertinent Imaging and other tests:

EKG remarkable for sinus tachycardia, left axis deviation, and an old RBBB

CT head w/o contrast remarkable for only mild frontal volume loss

Chest XR – unremarkable

RUQ Bedside US and then official US completed and showed:

Working Diagnosis:

Hepatic hydatid cysts from Echinococcus tape worm

Hepatic abscesses

Metastatic cancer

Multiple biliary hamartomas

Polycystic liver disease

Caroli Disease

ED/Hospital course:

In the ED, the patient received IV Fluid boluses of NS 30mg/kg and one 1000mL of NS along with Tylenol, Vancomycin and Zosyn. The patient was admitted to Infectious Disease service. Throughout the hospital stay, CT Scan of abdomen and pelvis w/o contrast (due to AKI) was remarkable for infiltrated liver, splenic lesions, and destructive lesions of the bilateral iliac wings and L5 with pathologic fracture of the posterior right rib, which may be due to metastatic disease. The underlying etiology is uncertain. Without contrast, it was not certain if there was underlying macronodular cirrhosis. There was also associated ascites. Initial blood cultures from the ED grew Salmonella species. The patient was initially admitted the medical floor but was transferred to the Medical ICU on day 7 of hospitalization for increased lethargy and worsening lactic acidosis, transaminitis, and AKI. He later went into multisystem organ failure and was intubated thereafter. His code status was also changed to DNR/DNI. The patient unfortunately expired before endoscopy, colonoscopy, and biopsy could be performed.

Official Ultrasound read – Findings consistent with metastatic disease to the liver.

Pearls:

Hepatic Hydatid infection

  • Caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis
  • granulosus – Endemic in North America & Australia with dogs & wolves main as main host
  • multilocularis – Found in Northern Hemisphere with red fox, dogs, & cats as main host
  • Ultrasound would show a multiseptate cyst with daughter cysts
  • X-ray would show calcified rings
  • CT Abd/Pelvis may show the water-lily sign, which occurs when the endocystic membrane becomes detached, resulting in floating membranes within the pericyst, which mimics the appearance of a water lily ( Refer to Figure 1).

Figure 1. A detached membrane within the contents of the cyst, known as the water-lily sign

Pearls

Hepatic Hydatid infection

  • Infection may be asymptomatic for many years, with a long latent period (up to 50 years of age!)
  • Albendazole for confirmed infection
  • Reserve antibiotics for those in which diagnosis is uncertain due to risk of anaphylaxis
  • Most cases in U.S. occur in immigrants from endemic countries (South America, Middle East, eastern Mediterranean, sub Saharan, African, West China, former Soviet Union)
  • Confirmed cases in U.S. are rare

Patients with HIV

  • Always ask for CD4+ count and if they are on medications for their HIV/AIDs
  • Have a low threshold for doing an aggressive workup for these individuals, especially if poor follow up
  • HIV is a risk factor for Salmonella bacteremia
    • Other risk factors include any immunosuppressed state, liver disease, hemoglobinopathies (decreased splenic function)
    • Most salmonella bacteremia can have a preceding diarrheal illness
    • Major complication is endovascular infection
    • Treatment is IV fluoroquinolones or 3rd generation cephalosporin

Case presented by Jessica Williams, MD, PGY1

Case of the Week COW #7

CC: Numbness and palpitations

HPI: 21-year-old Female presents to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining of palpitations and left arm weakness with perioral numbness, which began just prior to arrival. The patient states the episode lasted 30 minutes before completely resolving on its own. In the ED, she denies any other complaints except for a mild headache. Patient notes she experienced a similar episode of palpitations yesterday afternoon, while resting, which she described as “skipping beats”. On further questioning, the patient admitted to being hospitalized to a NYC hospital 2 weeks ago where she had a Cardiac Echocardiogram done which showed “hypertrophy.” Patient never followed up with cardiologist as instructed. In the past, a doctor in her country prescribed her an unknown antihypertensive medication, which she took for one year but stopped taking it once she moved to NJ. Denies fever, dizziness, chest pain, and shortness of breath, recent travels, calf pain or swelling.

Physical Exam:

BP 109/72   HR 82     RR 18     SpO2 100% on RA    Temp 97.0F

General: Well appearing female, in non-acute distress

HEENT: NCAT, pupils PERRLA, neck supple

Respiratory: CTA B/L, no wheezing, rales or rhonchi

Cardiac: +S1/S2, no MRG, regular rhythm

Abdomen: soft NT ND

Neuro exam: AAO X 3, No focal deficits

Extremities: no edema, no tenderness or swelling, 5/5 strength in all extremities. Sensory intact

Skin: pink and warm, No diaphoresis, no rashes, lacerations, or abrasions

Pertinent Labs: Troponin 0.308

Pertinent Imaging and other tests:

  • Chest X-Ray: Cardiomegaly with a boot shaped heart, which may indicated right heart failure.
  • CT Head: Normal 
  •  ECG: Normal Sinus Rhythm, Bi-atrial enlargement, RBBB, LVH

Working Diagnosis: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCOM)

ED/Hospital course:  Patient was given 324 mg of ASA and admitted to Telemetry with a diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. While still in the ED waiting for a bed on Telemetry the patient had multiple runs of non-sustained V-Tach and Cardiology was consulted. The patient was started on ASA and Metoprolol PO. A 2D ECHO was done which was consistent with HCOM. Patient remained stable on Telemetry for 3 days prior to discharge. The patient’s Troponin was trended daily, 0.308 in the ED, 0.288 on day 1 of admission, and 0.314 on day 2 of admission. Patient was told to follow up with Cardiology Clinic for possible AICD placement planning.

Pearls:

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common inherited cardiac disorders (affecting ~ 1 in 500 people) and is the number one cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Annual mortality is estimated at 1-2 %.

  • Pathology and Pathophysiology:
    • Dynamic Obstruction of the Left Ventricular Outflow Obstruction (LVOT)
    • Primarily Autosomal Dominant Inheritance
    • Left Ventricular diastolic dysfunction resulting from impaired relaxation and filling of the stiff and hypertrophied left ventricle (often associated with increased filling pressure)
    • Abnormal intramural coronary arteries with thickened walls and narrow lumens
    • Chaotic, disorganized left ventricular architecture (“ cellular disarray’) predisposing to abnormal transmission of electrical impulses and thus serving as a substrate for the formation of arrhythmia.
  • Clinical Manifestation
    • Exertional syncope or pre-syncope – this is the most worrisome symptom, suggesting dynamic LVOT obstruction with or without dysrhythmia, with the potential for sudden cardiac death.
    • Symptoms of pulmonary congestions due to left ventricular dysfunction (e.g. exertional dyspnea, fatigue, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea)
    • Chest pain – may be typical angina pain due to increased demand (thicker myocardial walls) and reduced supply (aberrant coronary arteries).
    • Palpitations due to supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias.
  • ECG Features:
    • Left atrial enlargement
    • Left ventricular hypertrophy with associated ST segment / T-wave abnormalities
    • Deep, narrow (“dagger-like”) Q waves in the Lateral (V5-6, I, aVL) and inferior (II, III, aVF) leads. Most common in Lateral vs. Inferior
    • Giant precordial T-wave inversions in apical HCM
    • Signs of WPW (Short PR, delta wave)
    • Dysrhythmias: Atrial Fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, PACs, PVCs, VT

*** Infarction Q Waves are wider with a different morphology compared to HCM.

Pathologic Q Waves:

  • Usually > 40 ms (1mm) wide
  • > 2mm Deep
  • > 25% of depth of QRS Complex
  • Best seen in V1-V3

 

Post by Tyler Manis, MD, PGY4

Case of the week COW #6

CC: Vomiting for 2 days

HPI: 32 yo female with PMH of Romano Ward Syndrome s/p AICD, previous cardiac arrest, Atrial Fibrillation s/p Ablation, renal artery thrombosis on Coumadin and deafness presents to the Emegency Department (ED) via ALS after being found unresponsive at home and with ventricular tachycardia. Paramedics state they were called to the patient’s home for an “unconscious” person. They arrived to find the patient lethargic but arousable, cool, pale, and diaphoretic with BP 90/50. The patient soon became unresponsive and was in Ventricular tachycardia on the monitor. Patient underwent synchronized cardioversion with 150 Joules and converted to sinus tachycardia. Patient also received 150 mg Amiodarone bolus and 250 mL of Normal Saline IVF. Patient’s sister arrived to ED approximately 10 minutes after patient’s arrival and states that patient had multiple episodes of becoming unconscious at home earlier today. Denied recent illness, fever/chills, vomiting, diarrhea

Physical Exam:

BP 133/105,   HR 115 Sinus tachycardia,   RR 20,   SpO2 100% on 3 lpm NC,    Temp 97.0F

General: Lethargic but arousable to painful stimuli

HEENT: NCAT, pupils PERRLA, neck supple

Respiratory: Moderate respiratory distress with bibasilar rales, otherwise clear, no wheezing

Chest: AICD in left anterior chest

Cardiac: +S1/S2, no MRG, tachycardia, regular rhythm

Abdomen: soft NT ND

Neuro exam: arousable to painful stimuli, pt reading lips, answering appropriately

Extremities: weak thready pulses throughout, no edema

Skin: cool, pale, diaphoretic, no rashes, lacerations, or abrasions

 Labs:

CBC: Unremarkable     CMP: K 3.2   Glucose 595     BUN/Cr 17/1.62

AST/ALT 359/401       INR: 1.7             Troponin 0.122

ED Course: Approximately 5 minutes after arrival to the ED during the initial exam, patient became unresponsive and was noted to be in Ventricular Fibrillation on the monitor. CPR/ACLS was started and patient was intubated immediately. Her defibrillator appeared to be delivering shocks however there was no conversion of the rhythm. ACLS was performed for 30 minutes and pulses were regained multiple times. Patient was in V-fib, then PEA, then V-tach arrest. 100mg Lidocaine and 2 grams Magnesium were also given. Defibrillation with external pads ultimately led to Return of Spontaneous circulation. Bloody, frothy sputum was also noted from the ETT post-arrest. A right IJ central line was placed

EKG:

Pre-arrest: Atrial-paced with PACs. QTc 503      Post-arrest: Atrial tachycardia. QTc 609

DX: VFib & VTach arrest s/p ROSC in the setting of Congenital Long QT syndrome and AICD non-capture.

ED/Hospital course:  Post-ROSC EKG did not show STEMI. Post-ROSC Chest XR demonstrated diffused pulmonary edema. Patient was hypoxic with SpO2 in the 80s on 100% FiO2. Decreased tidal volume and increased PEEP improved oxygenation. Bedside cardiac Ultrasound showed global hypokinesis and no pericardial effusion. CT Head w/o contrast was normal. Amiodarone drip was started. Hypothermia protocol was initiated. The patient was admitted to the CCU. She did not code again while in the ED. Her AICD was interrogated and it showed she had been in sustained Vtach to which her AICD gave multiple shocks without capture. She was in the hospital for 11 days where she initially was improving and was therefore extubated after 7 days. Unfortunately she again went into Vtach arrest multiple times and then PEA arrest and was pronounced dead.

Pearls:

Congenital Long QT Syndrome (LQTS)

  • The major variant of congenital prolonged QT syndrome (there are 6 total). Affects estimated 1/2500 to 1/7000 people worldwide
  • Can have varying degrees of penetrance
  • Thought to account for ~3000/year of sudden deaths in children
  • May play a roll in prevalence of SIDS
  • Autosomal dominant inheritance, results in mutation of genes responsible for creating ion-channel proteins. The impaired transport of ions in cardiac tissue causes prolonged QT à impaired repolarization à ventricular arrhythmias (symptomatically syncope, seizure, cardiac arrest). May also present with AV blocks and bradydysrhythmias.
  • Romano-Ward is the more common, autosomal dominant (AD) form with purely cardiac phenotype.
  • The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome refers to the autosomal recessive (AR) phenotype of congenital LQTS that is associated with profound sensorineural hearing loss and a high risk for sudden death. MORE MALIGNANT CLINICAL COURSE. Our patient likely had this variation since she also had deafness.

Management and treatment

  • Beta- blockers = 1st line treatment in symptomatic patients. Blunts catecholaminergic response
  • Whenever syncopal episodes recur despite full-dose beta-blocking therapy, left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) should be considered. Cardiac pacing is only rarely indicated (e.g. in infants or young children with 2:1 atrioventricular block).
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are always indicated after cardiac arrest, or when requested by the patient, and whenever syncope recurs despite beta-blockade and LCSD.
  • Potassium supplementation or spironolactone
  • Other antiarrhythmic therapy based on genotype

Risk Factors  for syncope or SCD

  • Congenital deafness
  • Hx/o syncope
  • Hx/o Ventricular arrhythmia
  • Family hx/o SCD
  • Female gender
  • QTc > 600ms
  • Medical non-compliance

Event triggers (vary depending on which genetic mutation)

  • Exercise-related
  • Auditory stimuli (alarm clock, telephone ringing!)
  • Acute emotional events
  • Catecholamine-induced
  • Pregnancy and up to 9 months post-partum
  • Onset of menopause

Post by Katrina D’Amore, DO.

 

Case of the Week (COW) #5

CC: Vomiting for 2 days

HPI: 47 year old female with PMHX of HTN and ETOH abuse presents with abdominal pain. Patient states that beginning two days ago she was woken up from her sleep with sudden onset non-bloody vomiting as well as epigastric pain which radiates to the back and is sharp in nature. She admits to over 15 episodes of vomiting. She is also having cramping of her feet bilaterally. She admits to daily ETOH use, and states her last intake was two days ago, denies illicit drug use. Denies taking any medication prior to arrival. Denies fever, chills, chest pain, SOB or dysuria. Denies recent travel or sick contacts. PMHX/PSHX: none Meds: none Allergies: none

Physical Exam: Vitals: BP 150/96 P 98 RR 16 O2 sat 98% RA General: Awake, alert, anxious Cardiac: Regular rate, no murmurs Lungs: CTAB, no rales, no rhonchi, no wheezing Abd: soft, non-distended, Mild tenderness to palpation epigastric area

Labs: Magnesium- 1.3 Potassium- 3.5 Troponin- 0.017

EKG:

DX: Prolonged QT interval with non-sustained polymorphic Ventricular tachycardia secondary to Hypomagnesemia

ED/Hospital course:  Upon arrival to ED patient had Epigastric pain with vomiting, Patient started on IVF and received Pepcid and Zofran. EKG at this time showed QT prolongation and patient found to have magnesium of 1.3. While waiting for magnesium, she started to have short runs of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and during these times she complained of chest tightness. After 2 grams of magnesium patients repeat EKG showed normal QT and runs of ventricular tachycardia stopped. She received another 2mg of Magnesium and 40 mEq of Potassium Chloride. Patient was then admitted to Telemetry floor. Patient observed for 24hours and discharged to home with follow up with a cardiologist and Norvasc 5 mg 1tab PO daily, Losartan 100 mg 1tab PO daily, Ranitidine 150mg 1tab PO BI.

Pearls:

  • An abnormally prolonged QTc, especially >500 is associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, Torsade’s de Pointes
  • Prolonged QT with prolonged T wave is due to: HypoK, HypoMg, Medications, Elevated ICP, Cardiac ischemia, Congenital.
  • Prolonged QT with prolonged ST-segment is due to: HypoCa, Hypothermia.
  • If EKG reveals long QT start by reviewing drug history and checking electrolytes. Stop any offending agents. Suppress early after depolarization with IV magnesium sulfate and keep potassium >4.5meq/L.
  • If non responsive to magnesium, may consider cardiac pacing and rarely isoproterenol infusion. Acceleration of the heart rate may produce suppression of arrhythmias, with a reduction in the QT interval.
  • Unstable patients should undergo non-synchronized electrical defibrillation.

Post by: Dr. Kerri Clayton, DO

 

Case of the Week #3 – Why my flap sunken?

CC: Altered mental status and frequent falls

HPI: 55 y/o male presents from rehab with altered mental status (lethargy and agitation) and frequent falls for the past 2 days. Patient has a PMHx of large traumatic subdural hematoma 9 months ago treated with a craniectomy, seizure disorder, and HTN. Patient complains of headache and is a difficult historian. Pt does answer some questions appropriately.

Pertinent PE and Vitals: BP 121/81 HR 98 RR 16 Temp 98.1 100% on RA

GCS=14 and in no acute distress

L pupil dilated at 4 mm and nonreactive. R pupil 1 mm and reactive.

Pt. with moderate R arm and leg weakness (patient has baseline weakness but this is worse).

Pertinent Labs (if any): Unremarkable workup

Imaging

Working Diagnosis at time of Disposition Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome (also known as Syndrome of the Trephined) with possible Paradoxical Herniation

ED & Hospital Course Patient was admitted and received neurology and neurosurgical consultations. Medications were adjusted to control agitation. It is questionable per the consultants if his symptoms were due to paradoxical brain herniation. Plan is for an outpatient cranioplasty.

Pearls & Takeaways

  • Sinking skin flap syndrome is a delayed complication of a decompressive craniectomy. As the herniated brain tissue recedes, the skin flap from the surgical site can become sunken.
  • Symptoms include headaches, dizziness, seizure, and mood changes.
  •  Symptoms worsen when is head elevated vs reclined; treatment option is cranioplasty. Symptoms are much worse in an upright posture.
  • If atmospheric pressure exceeds intracranial pressure, patients can get paradoxical herniation and midline shift. This is more of an emergency and symptoms include focal deficits, pupillary changes, and alterations in consciousness.
  •  Paradoxical herniation is a state of low intracranial pressures; therefore traditional measures to treat midline shift and ICP will worsen the condition such as mannitol, hyperventilation, etc.
  • Treatment of sunken skin flap with paradoxical herniation is to elevate the intracranial pressure, including Trendelenburg position, hydration, and clamping of any CSF drains. Definitive treatment is cranioplasty.

Case of the Week #2 – I can’t pee!!

CC: Urinary retention

HPI: 44 yo F presents with suprapubic abdominal pain since this AM. She also complains of dysuria and denies fever, chills, hematuria, vaginal bleeding or discharge, flank pain, N/V/D, CP, SOB or any other symptoms. This is her third visit to the ED in the past 3 days for urinary retention. On patient’s initial visit, she c/o pelvic pain, dysuria and urinary retention for 12 hours.  A straight urinary catheter was placed, and 2 liters of urine was drained and the pt was d/c’d home and told to follow up with her PMD. Yesterday, pt returned once again to the ED c/o urinary retention during which a Foley catheter was placed and 900 cc of urine was collected. No UTI was documented. Today, pt still c/o a sense of fullness and has been unable to urinate since 4 am despite having the Foley catheter in place and emptying the bag. Pt called her PMD last night during which he prescribed her Ciprofloxacin for a presumed UTI.

PMH/PSH: None

Meds/Allergies: None

Social: Denies

Physical Exam: Vitals: BP 130/84 P 144 RR 17 O2 sat 100% RA Temp 98.2F

General: Awake, alert, in no acute distress, comfortable
Cardiac: RRR , S1 S2, no murmurs
Lungs: CTAB, no rales, no rhonchi, no wheezing
Abd: Soft, with mild tenderness in suprapubic area. No distention. No rebound or guarding
Back: No CVA tenderness
GU: Foley catheter in place with empty bag
Extremities: No edema or rashes. Able to move all extremities
Neuro: AAO x 3

Labs

WBC: 10. 5
Hg/Hct: 13.3/40
Platelet: 215

Na: 141
K+4.6
CL –: 102
CO2: 26
BUN: 9
Cr: 0.83

Urine HCG: Negative

Urinalysis:
Ketones: Small
Blood: Small
Nitrite Urine: NEG
Leukocyte Esterase: Moderate
RBC: 0-3
WBC: 11-20
Bacteria: Rare

Imaging: 

DDX: Vaginal Mass vs Urinary Retention vs UTI

ED Course: 

Upon evaluation, the Foley catheter’s leg bag straps were fitted incorrectly causing a drainage bag obstruction. In the ED, the obstruction was resolved and catheter was successful draining urine.

The reading of the CT abd/pelvis was: CT Abd/Pelvis W/ and w/o Contrast: There is a 9.9 x 9.4 x 9.9 cm vaginal mass, which displaces the uterus cephalad, and likely the cervix and the bladder anteriorly which is quite effaced. The mass is likely centered in the mid and posterior vagina, which is worrisome for a vaginal or possibly a cervical malignancy although could be of other etiology and warrants a follow up MRI. The most worrisome component is anteriorly to the left where there is either a lymph node measuring 3.7 x 2.5 x 4.7 cm or extrusion of the mass. A left ovary is likely seen with an involuting cyst measuring 2.1 x 1.6 x 1.7 cm quite cephalad to the lesion

OB/GYN was consulted. They came down to evaluate the patient and perform a vaginal speculum exam, which revealed a small amount of malodorous thick discharge similar to pus and a palpable mass in left vaginal wall. OB-GYN recommended patient continues to take Ciprofloxacin as prescribed by her PMD and return to the Emergency Dept. in 3-4 days for re-evaluation and admission to the hospital for a Diagnostic laparoscopy

Pt returned to the ED 4 days later, during which she was admitted and underwent a diagnostic laparoscopy, Left salpingo-oophorectomy and resection of vaginal mass. Foley Catheter was inserted in operating room and pt was d/c home from Same day Surgery.

Discussion:

• Acute Urinary Retention (AUR) in women is rare. It is estimated that are 3 cases of AUR per 100,000 women per year.

• The female to male incidence ration is 1:13

• The most common cause of AUR is obstruction. In women, it is usually secondary to anatomic distortion, including pelvic organ prolapse, pelvic masses, or less likely urethral diverticulum.

• Other less common etiologies include neurogenic causes (MS, Cauda equine syndrome, metastatic spinal cord lesion, neuropathy) and infectious causes (cystitis, Herpes simplex (genital), local abscess, PID).

• Evaluation should include: UA with urine cultures, Chemistry, CBC if you suspect infection or massive hematuria, and a bedside ultrasound to verify retention. Then bladder decompression by inserting Foley catheter. Incomplete retention is PVR > 50mL and > 100mL in patients > 65 years of age

• Pearls: Urinary retention in women is rare. Think of a pelvic mass as a cause, especially if urine is clean. Have a low threshold for obtaining a CT Abd/pelvis to confirm diagnosis.

Post by: Dr. Yenis Paez-Perez, DO

 

Case of the Week #1

CC Chest pain and palpitations

HPI Pt is a 23 y/o male with no PMHx presenting with c/o palpitations, chest pain since last night. Pt states the pain is localized to the mid sternal chest wall with radiation to b/l upper extremities at times. Pt states the pain came on suddenly last night and he didn’t think anything of it so he went to bed. He woke up this morning with same pain and now with associated nausea and dizziness prompting the visit to the ED. Pt has never had pain like this in the past. Denies vomiting, F/C, recent illness, sudden cardiac death in the family other than a 70 y/o uncle who was obese. Pt denies drug use and states he was drinking over the weekend 2 days ago.

PMHx: none

Meds: none

Allergies: none

PSHx: none

Social: occasional ETOH, (-) drugs

Pertinent PE and Vitals: BP 90/62 P 186 RR 22 O2 sat 100% RA

General: Awake, alert, mild distress Cardiac: (+) tachycardic; no murmurs Lungs: CTAB, no rales, no rhonchi, no wheezing Abd: soft, nontender, nondistended Skin: diaphoretic; mild pallor

Pertinent Labs (if any) Troponin: 0.439

DDX: SVT with aberrancy vs VTach

ED Course: Pt placed on cardiac monitor immediately and IVF bolus initiated. Adenosine 12 mg IVP given while rhythm strip running with no change. A second dose of Adenosine 12 mg IVP given again with no change. 150 mg Amiodarone given with improvement of HR from 190’s to 170’s still wide complex. Second dose of 150 mg Amiodarone given with improvement of HR from 170‘s to 150’s and eventually converted to a NSR rate 85. Pt remained in stable condition and BP responsive to IVF. Pt admitted to telemetry and Cardiology consulted. While still in the ED, pt reverted back to wide complex tachycardia. 3rd dose of 150 mg Amiodarone given and recommendation from Cardiology was to try a 20 mg IVP of Cardizem. Cardizem given and pt immediately converted to NSR. Pt started on Cardizem drip and upgraded to the CCU. Pt underwent EPS and AV dissociation was noted. Determination was Verapamil Sensitive Ventricular Tachycardia. Pt remained stable throughout hospital course and started on Verapamil. Discharged on hospital day #3 with follow up with cardiology clinic.

Final Dx:  Idiopathic Fascicular Left Ventricular Tachycardia AKA • Fascicular Tachycardia • Verapamil-sensitive VT • Belhassen-type VT

Discussion:  MC type of idiopathic tachycardia of LEFT ventricle ! It is a reentrant tachycardia typically seen in young patients without structural heart disease ! Verapamil is first line treatment • Dose: 10 mg IVP over 1 minute ! EKG features: • Monomorphic V tach • QRS 100-140 ms (narrower than other forms of Tach) • Short RS interval 60-80 ms • RBBB pattern • Axis deviation depends on anatomical site of re-entry circuit ! Often misdiagnosed as SVT with RBBB ! Keys to dx: • Observe features of VT such as caption/fusion beats, AV dissociation • Usually unresponsive to adenosine, vagal maneuvers, or beta blockers

Post by: Kristen Pena, DO